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Monthly Archives: December 2019

3 Ways To Take A Hands Off Approach To Your Financial Management

This contributed post is for informational purposes only. Please consult a business, financial and legal professional before making any decisions.

financial management

We’re all busy people. There are only so many hours in the day, but there are seemingly countless numbers of tasks that we have to perform in those hours. Not feeling that you have enough time to manage your life as you should can be overwhelming, and can also lead to dropped balls that take a long time to recover from.

Your finances are one area that should demand your attention but, inevitably, they can be pushed to one side during times of high stress. While this is fine on an occasional basis — we all need a break every now and then — if you find the situation is becoming chronic, then you should look for an alternative financial management strategy instead.

If you’re constantly finding that you’re too busy to manage your finances in the way you would prefer, a “hands off” strategy might be the best way forward for you. While you can’t fully automate and abandon your entire budgeting strategy, there are a few tricks you can use to help alleviate the time burden.Continue reading

Joe Paretta Explains How He ‘Mastered the Card’

Debt Dungeon, Episode #1: Joe Paretta is a coach, author, speaker, and teacher. He published his first book in November 2010, Master The Card: Say Goodbye to Credit Card Debt…Forever!, which he considers a “labor of love.” To learn more about Joe and his efforts, check out JoeParetta.com.

Make sure to check out Joe’s article on FinancialBin.com, “How Joe Paretta, Author of “Master The Card: Say Goodbye to Credit Card Debt,” Escaped the Debt Dungeon (Episode #1).”

QUESTIONS FOR JOE …

1. Tell us a little about yourself. What’s your background?

2. What led you to getting into debt? How did you accumulate so much debt?

3. What were you spending money on?

4. At what point did you say to yourself — I need to make a change?

5. How did you pay it all off? How long did it take you?

6. What did you learn from all of this?

7. Tell us about the book, ‘Master the Card.’ Why did you write it?

8. What are you doing today — besides being an author?

9. What are your plans for this year?

10. What are two or three tips you can pass on to members of Gen Y who may be in credit card debt, student loan debt or both?

11. How can listeners get in contact with your or buy the book?

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